Nuclear Molecular and Theranostic Imaging for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer


Sheikh A., Polack B., Rodriguez Y., Kuker R.

MOLECULAR IMAGING AND RADIONUCLIDE THERAPY, vol.26, pp.50-65, 2017 (ESCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Review
  • Volume: 26
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Doi Number: 10.4274/2017.26.suppl.06
  • Journal Name: MOLECULAR IMAGING AND RADIONUCLIDE THERAPY
  • Journal Indexes: Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI), Scopus, TR DİZİN (ULAKBİM)
  • Page Numbers: pp.50-65
  • Keywords: Nuclear medicine, RAI, I-131, I-123, I-124, FDG-PET/CT, thyroid carcinoma, differentiated thyroid cancer, theranostics, POSITRON-EMISSION-TOMOGRAPHY, NEEDLE-ASPIRATION BIOPSY, WHOLE-BODY SCAN, HIGH-RISK DTC, SERUM THYROGLOBULIN, RADIOIODINE THERAPY, F-18-FDG PET/CT, FOLLOW-UP, FDG-PET, CARCINOMA METASTASES
  • Dokuz Eylül University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Traditional nuclear medicine is rapidly being transformed by the evolving concepts in molecular imaging and theranostics. The utility of new approaches in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) diagnostics and therapy has not been fully appreciated. The clinical information, relevant to disease management and patient care, obtained by scintigraphy is still being underestimated. There has been a trend towards moving away from the use of radioactive iodine (RAI) imaging in the management of the disease. This paradigm shift is supported by the 2015 American Thyroid Association Guidelines (1). A more systematic and comprehensive understanding of disease pathophysiology and imaging methodologies is needed for optimal utilization of different imaging modalities in the management of DTC. There have been significant developments in radiotracer and imaging technology, clinically proven to contribute to the understanding of tumor biology and the clinical assessment of patients with DTC. The research and development in the field continues to evolve, with expected emergence of many novel diagnostic and therapeutic techniques. The role for nuclear imaging applications will continue to evolve and be reconfigured in the changing paradigm. This article aims to review the clinical uses and controversies surrounding the use of scintigraphy, and the information it can provide in assisting in the management and treatment of DTC.