Neuroelectric responses of sportsmen and sedentaries under cognitive stress


Bayazit O., ÜNGÜR G.

COGNITIVE NEURODYNAMICS, vol.12, no.3, pp.295-301, 2018 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 12 Issue: 3
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Doi Number: 10.1007/s11571-018-9478-0
  • Journal Name: COGNITIVE NEURODYNAMICS
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus
  • Page Numbers: pp.295-301
  • Keywords: Sportsmen, EEG spectral power, EDA, Concentration grid test, Cognitive stress, WORKING-MEMORY, ALPHA, SYNCHRONIZATION, OSCILLATIONS, EXPERTISE, ALERTNESS, DELTA
  • Dokuz Eylül University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Stress and anxiety are states which sportsmen are continuously exposed to. Our study aimed to evaluate neuroelectrical peripheral and central nervous system responses of sportsmen (SPR) and sedentary individuals (SED) during concentration grid test (CGT) employed under time pressure. Forty three SPR and 33 SED participated in the study. Neuroelectrical responses were simultaneously obtained during baseline and CGT. All responses were observed to increase under stress in both SED and SPR. The SPR's stress related peripheral responses were lower than SED's. When central values were evaluated a stress related increase according to baseline was observed in all frequency powers in all of the participants. Statistical comparison of increase rates revealed a significantly greater increase in beta in SED compared to SPR. Beta has been associated to alertness and cortical arousal. As SED exhibit greater beta increase under stress compared to SPR their state of cortical arousal and alertness may be interpreted to be higher than SPR. However the SPR's weak increase in beta and their lower peripheral responses taken together may imply that they are better in stress management. In fact according to their performance scores the SPR's higher level of performance under stress compared to SED shows that they are better at maintaining and focusing their attention under stress than SED.