Formal thought disorder in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: A systematic review and meta-analysis


Yalincetin B., BORA İ. E., BİNBAY İ. T., Ulas H., AKDEDE B. B., ALPTEKİN K.

SCHIZOPHRENIA RESEARCH, vol.185, pp.2-8, 2017 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Review
  • Volume: 185
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Doi Number: 10.1016/j.schres.2016.12.015
  • Journal Name: SCHIZOPHRENIA RESEARCH
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI), Scopus
  • Page Numbers: pp.2-8
  • Keywords: Formal thought disorder, Schizophrenia, Bipolar disorder, STRUCTURAL BRAIN ABNORMALITIES, FOLLOW-UP, COMMUNICATION DISORDERS, COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT, NEGATIVE SYMPTOMS, WORKING-MEMORY, D-AMPHETAMINE, LANGUAGE, SPEECH, MANIA
  • Dokuz Eylül University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Historically, formal thought disorder has been considered as one of the distinctive symptoms of schizophrenia. However, research in last few decades suggested that there is a considerable clinical and neurobiological overlap between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BP). We conducted a meta-analysis of studies comparing positive (PTD) and negative formal thought disorder (NTD) in schizophrenia and BP. We included 19 studies comparing 715 schizophrenia and 474 BP patients. In the acute inpatient samples, there was no significant difference in the severity of PTD (d = -0.07, CI = -0.22-0.09) between schizophrenia and BP. In stable patients, schizophrenia was associated with increased PTD compared to BP (d = 1.02, CI = 0.35-1.70). NTD was significantly more severe (d = 0.80, CI = 0.52-0.1.08) in schizophrenia compared to BP. Our findings suggest that PTD is a shared feature of both schizophrenia and BP but persistent PTD or NTD can distinguish subgroups of schizophrenia from BP and schizophrenia patients with better clinical outcomes. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.