Evaluation of possible COVID-19 reinfection in children: A multicenter clinical study


ERBAŞ İ. C., Keleş Y. E., Erdeniz E. H., Yılmaz A. T., Yeşil E., ÇAKICI Ö., ...More

Archives de Pediatrie, vol.30, no.3, pp.187-191, 2023 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 30 Issue: 3
  • Publication Date: 2023
  • Doi Number: 10.1016/j.arcped.2023.01.008
  • Journal Name: Archives de Pediatrie
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus, Academic Search Premier, PASCAL, BIOSIS, CAB Abstracts, EMBASE, MEDLINE, Veterinary Science Database
  • Page Numbers: pp.187-191
  • Keywords: Children, COVID-19, Pediatrics, Reinfection, SARS-CoV-2
  • Dokuz Eylül University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Background: Although it was originally unknown whether there would be cases of reinfection of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) as seen with other coronaviruses, cases of reinfection were reported from various regions recently. However, there is little information about reinfection in children. Methods: In this study, we aimed to investigate the incidence and clinical findings of reinfection in pediatric patients who had recovered from COVID-19. We retrospectively evaluated all patients under 18 years of age with COVID-19 infection from a total of eight healthcare facilities in Turkey, between March 2020 and July 2021. Possible reinfection was defined as a record of confirmed COVID-19 infection based on positive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test results at least 3 months apart. Results: A possible reinfection was detected in 11 out of 8840 children, which yielded an incidence of 0.12%. The median duration between two episodes of COVID-19 was 196 (92–483) days. When initial and second episodes were compared, the rates of symptomatic and asymptomatic disease were similar for both, as was the severity of the disease (p = 1.000). Also, there was no significant difference in duration of symptoms (p = 0.498) or in hospitalization rates (p = 1.000). Only one patient died 15 days after PCR positivity, which resulted in a 9.1% mortality rate for cases of reinfection in pediatric patients. Conclusion: We observed that children with COVID-19 were less likely to be exposed to reinfection when compared with adults. Although the clinical spectrum of reinfection was mostly similar to the first episode, we reported death of a healthy child during the reinfection.