Ganglion cells in the human prostate


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Yorukoglu K., Tuna B., Kirkali Z.

PROSTATE CANCER AND PROSTATIC DISEASES, vol.3, no.1, pp.34-36, 2000 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 3 Issue: 1
  • Publication Date: 2000
  • Doi Number: 10.1038/sj.pcan.4500396
  • Journal Name: PROSTATE CANCER AND PROSTATIC DISEASES
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus
  • Page Numbers: pp.34-36
  • Keywords: prostate, ganglia, cancer staging
  • Dokuz Eylül University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Prostate carcinoma infiltrating around ganglion cells is claimed to be diagnostic of extracapsular extension because ganglion cells are only found in periprostatic soft tissue. However, the presence of autonomic ganglion cells in the fibrous capsule of the prostate has been reported. In this study, we aimed to define the exact localization of the ganglion cells in radical prostatectomy specimens. Slides of 64 totally embedded radical prostatectomies were reviewed. The ganglion cells were noted as outside the gland if no relation could be defined with prostate capsule or prostatic glands. They were noted as in the capsule when ganglion cells were observed inside the capsule, which was easily and definitely discerned. Ganglion cells were noted as ill the prostate when ganglion cells were observed beneath the capsule and in close proximity to the prostatic glands. Also, the ganglion cells were noted as in the capsule if they were observed inside the capsule but not adjacent to the prostatic glands, and as outside the prostate when the capsule could not be easily defined and distant from the prostatic glands. Ganglion cells were observed ill the prostate in 12 cases (18.75%). There was no relationship of these ganglion cells with the tumor in the prostatectomy specimens. Ganglion cells were located in the capsule in 14 cases (21.9%). The ganglion cells were observed outside the prostate in the other 38 cases (59.4%). These results show that there may be ganglion cells the prostate. Therefore, defining ganglion cell invasion by the tumor as extracapsular invasion may lead to staging error and cause erroneous management of the disease. Presence of carcinoma in ganglion cells should be recorded by defining whether these structures are within or outside the prostate gland.