The Relationship Between Attributions to Femicide and Identification with Gender Group, Ambivalnt Sexism and Political Ideologies


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ÜZÜMÇEKER E., AKFIRAT S.

STUDIES IN PSYCHOLOGY-PSIKOLOJI CALISMALARI DERGISI, vol.38, no.1, pp.1-32, 2018 (ESCI) identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 38 Issue: 1
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Doi Number: 10.26650/sp372013
  • Journal Name: STUDIES IN PSYCHOLOGY-PSIKOLOJI CALISMALARI DERGISI
  • Journal Indexes: Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI), TR DİZİN (ULAKBİM)
  • Page Numbers: pp.1-32
  • Keywords: Femicide, group identification, attribution, ideology, ambivalent sexism, BENEVOLENT SEXISM, SOCIAL IDENTITY, RAPE VICTIMS, WOMEN, ATTITUDES, HOSTILE, TURKEY, MEN
  • Dokuz Eylül University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

This study aims to examine the relationship between attributions to femicide in Turkey and various other socio-psychological structures. Employing the social identity approach to the attribution theory, identification with gender group, levels of hostile and benevolent sexism, and conservatism of 306 participants were assessed. For assessing the attributions to femicide, 32 items were developed, and the final scale consisted of 20 items that were loaded on the following three factors: (i) attributions blaming the murderer, (ii) attributions blaming the victim, and (iii) attributions to social structure. The results indicate that women are higher on levels of attributions blaming the murderer and the social structure, while men are higher on levels of attributions blaming the victim. Identifying with one's own gender group for men appeared to negatively correlate with attributions blaming the murderer and social structure. Hostile sexism, in turn, seemed to positively correlate with attributions blaming the victim among both genders, while no such correlation was observed for benevolent sexism. Conservatism also positively correlated with attributions blaming the victim only among men. Moreover, there appeared to be a negative correlation between identification with one's own gender group and attributions blaming the murderer among men with higher levels of hostile sexism. The results are discussed in light of the existing literature.