Psychometric properties of patient-reported outcome questionnaires for patients with musculoskeletal disorders of the shoulder


Sahinoglu E., Ergin G., ÜNVER B.

KNEE SURGERY SPORTS TRAUMATOLOGY ARTHROSCOPY, vol.27, no.10, pp.3188-3202, 2019 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 27 Issue: 10
  • Publication Date: 2019
  • Doi Number: 10.1007/s00167-019-05369-7
  • Journal Name: KNEE SURGERY SPORTS TRAUMATOLOGY ARTHROSCOPY
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus
  • Page Numbers: pp.3188-3202
  • Keywords: Psychometric, Shoulder, Patient-reported outcome measures, Surveys and questionnaires, Shoulder pain, CROSS-CULTURAL ADAPTATION, UPDATED METHOD GUIDELINES, ROTATOR CUFF, SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, INSTABILITY, QUALITY, VERSION, VALIDATION, RESPONSIVENESS, SCORES
  • Dokuz Eylül University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Purpose To evaluate the psychometric properties of self-administered patient-reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires which were used in non-surgical homogeneous populations with musculoskeletal shoulder disorders. Methods The included studies were identified using eligibility criteria. The methodological quality of each article was assessed using the COSMIN checklist. The psychometric properties of original versions and translated versions of PROs were also assessed. Results Twenty articles were included. Two musculoskeletal shoulder disorders were identified that met the selection criteria: rotator cuff disease and glenohumeral instability. A total of 11 PROs were identified. In general, the methodological quality of the included studies is fair or poor. The Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC) and the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) are the most frequently evaluated PROs for patients with rotator cuff disease, and their psychometric properties seem to vary according to what language that they are in. For glenohumeral instability, the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index (WOSI) and the Oxford Instability Shoulder Score (OISS) are the most frequently evaluated PROs, and their psychometric properties seem to be adequate. Conclusion Using for rotator cuff disease is advised, for Norwegian users, the SPADI, WORC, Oxford Shoulder Score, and disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand. Dutch and Persian users could use the WORC. For Greek speakers, the SPADI is recommended. Turkish users could use the rotator cuff quality-of-life measure. For glenohumeral instability, Dutch and Norwegian speakers could use the WOSI and the OISS. Italian, Japanese, and Turkish users could use the WOSI. For English users, the OISS and the Shoulder Rating Questionnaire are recommended.