I (dis)like the way you (dis)like them: The role of extended contact on social distance and attitudes towards the ingroup


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Bagci S. C., Stathi S., Vezzali L., TÜRNÜKLÜ A., PİYALE Z. E.

BRITISH JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, vol.60, no.1, pp.95-120, 2021 (SSCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 60 Issue: 1
  • Publication Date: 2021
  • Doi Number: 10.1111/bjso.12381
  • Journal Name: BRITISH JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
  • Journal Indexes: Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI), Scopus, Academic Search Premier, ASSIA, IBZ Online, International Bibliography of Social Sciences, PASCAL, CINAHL, Educational research abstracts (ERA), EMBASE, Index Islamicus, Linguistics & Language Behavior Abstracts, MEDLINE, Psycinfo, Social services abstracts, Sociological abstracts
  • Page Numbers: pp.95-120
  • Keywords: extended contact, ingroup attitudes, ingroup identification, morality, outgroup attitudes, social distance, CROSS-GROUP FRIENDSHIPS, IMPROVING INTERGROUP RELATIONS, OUTGROUP ATTITUDES, MEDIATING ROLE, BEHAVIORAL INTENTIONS, METAANALYTIC TEST, COLLECTIVE ACTION, NEGATIVE CONTACT, CONFLICT, MORALITY
  • Dokuz Eylül University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

While extended intergroup contact has been commonly studied in the context of prejudice reduction, less is known about its implications for processes related to the ingroup. Through three correlational and one experimental studies (total N = 897) conducted in two different intergroup contexts (Turkey and United Kingdom), we investigated whether extended intergroup contact relates to social distance and attitudes towards ingroup members as a function of outgroup attitudes. We also investigated ingroup identification and perceived ingroup morality as potential mediators in these associations. Correlational studies demonstrated that especially when outgroup attitudes were more negative, participants' positive (but not negative) extended contact was related to a more negative evaluation of the ingroup; whereas when outgroup attitudes were more positive, extended contact was associated with positive attitudes towards the ingroup. We found experimental evidence for the suggested relationships in relation to ingroup social distance. Findings are discussed in the light of vicarious dissonance theory and deprovincialization hypothesis.